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“Who Rides the White Horse?” Truth and Deception in the Book of Revelation E-mail
Written by Ian Boxall   
Tuesday, 05 July 2011 00:00

 

Ian Boxall is editor of Scripture Bulletin, and Tutor in New Testament at St Stephen’s House, Oxford

One of the most famous artistic portrayals of Revelation’s vision of the four horsemen, and one which has had a significant impact on the Western Christian imagination, is Albrecht Dürer’s woodcut of the scene, which was published along with his other Apocalypse scenes in 1498, when Dürer was only twenty-seven. Here we are presented with the four horses galloping furiously side by side across the page, ‘as if catapulted’ (in the words of one art historian),  bringing war, disaster, famine and destruction in their wake.

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Download this file (SBJuly2011.article3.pdf)SBJuly2011.article3.pdf208 Kb
 
Freed To Inspire: A Lecture on 7th Dec, 2010, to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the CBA E-mail
Written by Henry Wansbrough OSB   
Monday, 10 January 2011 00:00

Henry Wansbrough is a monk of Ampleforth. He has been Chairman of the Faculty of Theology at Oxford University, and served on the Pope’s Biblical Commission for eleven years. He is General Editor of The New Jerusalem Bible, and has written a number of books on biblical subjects.

The decision to found a Catholic Biblical Association was taken at the Easter meeting in 1940 of the Conference of Higher Studies, an annual gathering of Catholic teachers of tertiary education. The Chairman was to be Fr Cuthbert Lattey SJ of Heythrop, the Secretary was Fr Reginald Fuller. Cuthbert Lattey, in whose honour Reggie Fuller founded the series of Lattey Lectures, died in 1954.

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Download this file (SbJan2001.article1.pdf)SbJan2001.article1.pdf214 Kb
 
Translation and the KJV E-mail
Written by Nicholas King SJ   
Monday, 10 January 2011 20:11

Nicholas King SJ teaches New Testament and Greek at Campion Hall, Oxford and in the Oxford Faculty of Theology.

It is a pleasure to be welcoming in these pages the quatercentenary of that great monument and guiding light of the English language, the King James Version. It is necessary, of course, to make certain clarifications when we speak of this massive translation. It was not, as is sometimes oddly supposed, the work of James VI of Scotland, James I of England himself, for all that he was an alert and interested theologian, with a greater share of biblical scholarship than many monarchs have had.

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The Word of God for the Church and the World: An examination of Verbum Domini E-mail
Written by Adrian Graffy   
Monday, 10 January 2011 19:52

Fr Adrian Graffy is Director of the Commission for Evangelisation and Formation in the Diocese of Brentwood, and formerly taught Scripture at St John’s Seminary Wonersh. He is the editor of the Take and Read series (Alive Publishing).

The newly released post-synodal apostolic exhortation on the Word of God – Verbum Domini – refers to the document of the Second Vatican Council Dei Verbum as ‘a milestone in the Church’s history.’ It could be argued that Verbum Domini, which rejoices in a title synonymous with that of the Council document, is also such a milestone. An apostolic exhortation is not of course of equal importance, and Verbum Domini shows considerable deference to Dei Verbum by the frequency of citations and allusions. It might nevertheless be regarded as a milestone in that it evaluates the progress Catholics have made in their understanding and use of the Scriptures in the forty-five years since the end of Vatican II.

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Download this file (SBJan2011.article3.pdf)SBJan2011.article3.pdf170 Kb
 
Newman on Scripture E-mail
Written by Henry Wansbrough OSB   
Thursday, 01 July 2010 17:34

Henry Wansbrough is a monk of Ampleforth. He has been Chairman of the Faculty of Theology at Oxford University, and served on the Pope’s Biblical Commission for eleven years. He is General Editor of The New Jerusalem Bible, and has written a number of books on biblical subjects.

 

In this year when we are awaiting the beatification of Cardinal Newman it is appropriate to reflect on his contributions to scripture scholarship. He was, of course, primarily a patristic rather than a scripture scholar. However, despite a difficulty in reading German, it is striking to see from his Oxford lectures how familiar he was with the innovative German biblical scholarship of the day. Nevertheless, at least two of his important contributions remain interesting and relevant at the present day, namely his views on the interrelationship of scripture and tradition, and his reflections on the inspiration and inerrancy of the Bible. The former nexus of questions has its focus during the period when Newman was working his way towards the Catholic Church, the latter when he was already within it.

Attachments:
Download this file (July10 Article 1.pdf)July10 Article 1.pdf152 Kb
 
Preaching Luke's Gospel: Some Insights from John Henry Newman E-mail
Written by Ian Boxall   
Thursday, 01 July 2010 17:31

Ian Boxall teaches New Testament at St Stephen’s House, Oxford, where he is also Senior Tutor. He is the editor of Scripture Bulletin, and the author of the volume on Luke’s Gospel in the Take and Read series (Alive Publishing).

 

The tasks confronting the preacher in this liturgical year of Luke are complex and manifold. Some of these tasks are general issues relating to the interpretation of the biblical text, such as the relationship between the parts and the whole – an issue highlighted by more holistic approaches to the gospels such as narrative criticism. Others are more specifically related to the interpretation of Luke’s Gospel, such as ongoing questions of genre, or consideration of the precise relationship between the Gospel and Acts, with some recent appeals for ‘loosing the hyphen’ in the widely-used phrase ‘Luke-Acts’.  Still others are concerned with the ministry of preaching. How does one make the move as it were from the text – or the text in the study – to the pulpit, from interpretation to application? Or does such an articulation of the preacher’s task betray a misunderstanding of the complex processes at work both in exegesis and in homiletics, by treating application as a mere ‘add-on’ to a prior hermeneutical task? Recent trends in biblical scholarship, meanwhile, with their turn towards, on the one hand, bold theological readings of scriptural texts, and on the other, a renewed emphasis on the history of a text’s reception, seem only to compound the difficulties further.

Attachments:
Download this file (July10 Article 2.pdf)July10 Article 2.pdf171 Kb
 
Spirit-Led Freedom: Examining a Significant Detail in Galatians E-mail
Written by Timothy Ashworth   
Thursday, 01 July 2010 17:18

Timothy Ashworth is Biblical Studies Tutor at Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre in Birmingham.  He is author of Paul’s Necessary Sin: the Experience of Liberation, (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006) from which the central argument of this article is taken.

 

I come to the writing of this article having just led a course on Galatians for a group of Quakers.  The Quaker tradition rejects law as its organising principle; instead it has a set of structures for discerning the present guidance of the Spirit for the individual and community.  In the 1660s, the time of religious upheaval in which they emerged, Quakers had to distinguish themselves as a group from Ranters, whose rejection of law led to gross indulgence.  So, from then on, throughout Quaker history there has been an emphasis on faithful and tested responsiveness to guidance by the Spirit.  Direction and discipline there has been but always with a concern not to allow these to become an external imposition.  Paul had a similar problem in presenting his gospel: how do I affirm continuing moral discipline alongside the radical nature of freedom in the Spirit?

Attachments:
Download this file (July10 Article 3.pdf)July10 Article 3.pdf171 Kb
 
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